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Swampy’s World Episode ONE – The Western Front

Leo Dale, Ross Daniels and I do a little video series about Footscray and the Doggies, and Swampy.
Swampy – Ross Daniels
Camera – Leo Dale
Script – Ross Daniels
Editing – Leo Dale
Technical assistant – Phil Greenwood

Music – Leo Dale
Backing Vocals on theme – Nichaud Fitzgibbon
Accordion – Dave Evans
Fart sound – Mike Koenig

Thanks to the Westographer

Supported by Maribyrnong City Council
Community Grant Program

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CFA uses HDR image for Powerline illustration

Powerlines

The Country Fire Authority has chosen an image I shot a while ago to illustrate the dangers involved in letting trees grow near powerlines.

Just a quick shot whist on assignment and a single frame HDR conversion. Photomatix normally does very odd things to power lines against a sky and this is no exception.

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HDR Before and After image processing

A lot of people ask if the color in my images is real. Is it created with Photoshop or filters or some magic formula? The answer will vary depending on the image but over the last few years I have been refining a method using High Dynamic Range image processing as Tone Mapped images.

I use an application plugin for this purpose, Photomatix plugin for Aperture. The idea is to create a 32bit image from a bracket of separate exposures so that all details in a scene are captured at best exposure. The controls in the plugin allow you to re map the tones so that an 8bit or 16bit file can be created with all areas of the scene showing best exposure.
[beforeafter][/beforeafter]
There is a tendency for HDR images to look oversaturated and unreal. This is due to tones being all in the midrange and can be controlled to a large degree.

When shooting a sunset such as the one at Kilcunda above I wanted to show just how the original colors looked. All photographic reproduction calls for some remapping of tones so that very high dynamic range original scenery reproduces on the target media. For me this is a digital reproduction to photo paper for framing. HDR processing gives a much better capacity to achieve this.

In the example above the before image is auto exposure and color balance showing very little detail of the bridge itself or much density in the sunset. This is due to the image sensor not having the capacity to expose across such a large exposure range. The after image shows the result of combining 3 exposures two stops apart.

Most people are so used to seeing photographic aberrations such as low dynamic range as normal and so their impression of HDR is that there is some form of enhancement going on. While this is an enhancement HDR is as valid as any form of photographic manipulation. Everything from asking people to smile to waiting for the light to improve or selecting a specific exposure is an enhancement of sorts.

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Moving into Big studio

The Big Trousers office in Essex Street has been creaking at the seams for a while and so with it’s sale comes the opportunity to stretch out in the new warehouse conversion in Seddon.

The Green screen studio will be a fantastic opportunity and save my back from having to carry all that lighting equipment to the rental studio.

[googlemap lat=”-37.804261″ lng=”144.894998″ yaw=”64.45″ pitch=”-16.98″ zoom=”0″ width=”544px” height=”350px” align=”undefined” type=”STREETVIEW”]Seddon VIC 3011, Australia[/googlemap]

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19-21 Essex Street for sale

[googlemap lat=”-37.795987″ lng=”144.884772″ yaw=”176.81″ pitch=”-5.52″ zoom=”0″ width=”557px” height=”300px” align=”undefined” type=”STREETVIEW”]Big Trousers[/googlemap]

We are moving on and selling the little Shop/Office in Essex Street. Time for a bigger place with some room to handle the family and business.

Thought I should have a go at a Real Estate shot.

Here is the Shop No 19 online at Real Estate site and the Little House no 21 online.

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Police clamp down on tall photographers

Kent Police set a new legal precedent last week, as they arrested a photographer on the unusual grounds of “being too tall”.

This follows a year of increasingly unhappy incidents, in which continued reassurances from on high appear to have had little impact on how Police Forces deal with photographers – and reinforces a growing concern that the breakdown in trust and cooperation with the Police warned of in respect of demonstrations could soon transfer to photography too.

Read more here….